Associate Investigators

Professor Ross Anderson

Professor Ross Anderson

Ross Anderson is a professor of Epidemiology and Public Health, MRC-HPA Centre for Environment and Health. Ross holds posts at both at the Division of Population Health Sciences and Education, St George’s, University of London and at the Environmental Research Group, King’s College London.

Ross is a respiratory epidemiologist with a longstanding interest in the epidemiology of asthma and the health effects of air pollution. His early air pollution research was into the effects of indoor biomass burning in Papua New Guinea but over recent decades it has been mainly concerned with outdoor air pollution. The body of his research in this area has been concerned with time-series studies in the UK, Europe and Hong Kong and has included extensive systematic reviews and meta-analyses. More recently he has been investigating the effects of long term exposure to air pollution using health datasets from the UK and ISAAC and is also coordinating studies of the health effects of exposure to traffic pollution in London. Professor Ross Anderson is currently serving on a number of policy related committees, including the WHO Scientific Advisory Committee for reviewing the evidence on health aspects of air pollution for the European Union and the UK Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollution (COMEAP). Professor Anderson recently retired from the US Health Effects Institute Review Committee. He co-chairs the Expert Groups on chronic respiratory disease and on air pollution for the Global Burden of Disease project.

Professor Bert Brunekreef

Professor Bert Brunekreef

Professor Bert Brunekreef is an environmental epidemiologist working in the field of air pollution, health and the environment. After earning his PhD, he left the Netherlands to spend a year at the Harvard School of Public Health. In 2005 he became director of the Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences at the University of Utrecht. His research interests cover a broad range of indoor and outdoor environmental exposures and their health effects. Brunekreef often provides consulting services in the Netherlands and abroad on issues dealing with health and the environment. He was among the first researchers to show that damp, mouldy housing significantly increases the likelihood of childhood asthma.

Dr Shobhit Chandra

Dr Shobhit Chandra

Dr Shobhit Chandra, graduate of Cambridge University (PhD, 1994) is currently at RMIT University, Melbourne. His research focus is on spatial modelling for sustainability of water resources, natural habitats and urban settlements. His present research focus is on applications of mobile Augmented Reality technology in real-time visualisations

A/Prof Lyle Gurrin

A/Prof Lyle Gurrin

Lyle Gurrin is a biostatistician at Melbourne School of Population Health. He studied mathematics and statistics at the University of Western Australia and completed a PhD in biostatistics at the TVW Telethon Institute for Child Health Research in Perth. He is the principal investigator of the HealthIron cohort study of hereditary haemochromatosis and chief investigator on projects in asthma, allergy and immunology. His interest in methods for longitudinal and correlated data in cohort studies is reflected in his work on genetic association studies in families, twins and unrelated individuals. In addition to lecturing Master of Public Health biostatistics subjects at MSPH, he has developed and co-ordinated subjects in the Master of Biostatistics for the Biostatistics Collaboration of Australia (BCA)…”

Dr Fay Johnston

Dr Fay Johnston

Dr Fay Johnston is an environmental epidemiologist at the Menzies Research Institute Tasmania, Specialist Medical Advisor in Public and Environmental Health, Tasmanian Department of Health and Human Services, and a part time general practitioner for the Tasmanian Aboriginal Health Service. Her PhD in environmental epidemiology was awarded in 2008 and Master of Applied Epidemiology in 1997. She is a Fellow of the College of Physicians, Faculty of Public Health Medicine and the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine. Her program of research has largely focussed on the health impacts of smoke from bushfires and other types of biomass combustion and she contributes to several international research collaborations in the area of landscape fires, biomass smoke and health. Her current projects include (1) the evaluation of the relative health impacts of smoke from bushfires and planned burns; (2) the evaluation of public health interventions to reduce air pollution from domestic wood heaters; and (3) a retrospective evaluation of the mortality impacts of improvements to Launceston’s air quality from 2001.

Prof Wayne Smith

Professor Wayne Smith is the director of the Environmental Health Branch, NSW Health and is Conjoint Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Newcastle and an honorary professor of the School of Public Health, the University of Sydney. His research is broad ranging, including respiratory, nutritional, ophthalmic, environmental and genetic epidemiology. He has held more than 40 peer-reviewed grants and published 180 peer-reviewed papers. He is also involved in a range in a range of air pollution and health research and currently represents NSW health on a range of interjurisdictional national committees, including the National Environmental Health Committee - enHealth. He is currently on three NHMRC expert working groups and represents all State and Commonwealth Health departments on the National Environmental Protection Measures (NEPM) working group.