News - November 2012

Four prestigious Postdoctoral Fellowships have been awarded to Australian scientists, investigating air pollution and its effects on human health

CAR Postdoctoral Fellows

Four prestigious Postdoctoral Fellowships have been awarded to Australian scientists, investigating air pollution and its effects on human health. These Fellowships will offer early career researchers opportunities to be mentored by Australia’s foremost researchers and a platform to expand their skills and expertise. This exciting Postdoctoral fellowship program will enable the career development of future leaders in air pollution and health research.

The Fellowships have been announced by the Centre for Air quality and health Research and evaluation (CAR). CAR is a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centre of Research Excellence involving scientists from Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, University of New South Wales, University of Queensland, University of Wollongong, Queensland University of Technology, Monash University and University of Melbourne.

abc

Dr Martine Dennekamp

Dr Martine Dennekamp

My Fellowship will consist of a two part research program. The first will address a current gap in knowledge by investigating individual level health effects of smoke exposure from planned burns. The second part will focus on population level health effects looking at long and short term exposures to air pollutants on respiratory and cardiovascular health effects utilizing Australian population-based registries or using strong study designs (cohort studies) of detailed health outcomes.

Dr Yuming Guo

Dr Yuming Guo

The impacts of air pollution on human health have been drawing increasing concern from the environmental health research community, government, society, and general population. At the same time, temperature-related mortality has become a matter of increasing public health significance, especially because of climate change. Except the independent effects of air pollutants and temperature on mortality, the interactive effects between air pollutants and temperature on mortality is a key challenge to both society and government decision makers worldwide. In the proposed study, I will use advanced models to quantify the interactive effects of air pollutants and temperature on mortality.

Ms Christine Cowie

Ms Christine Cowie

My research program is focussed on urban exposures, specifically, the effects of traffic related air pollution. The fellowship will extend my current research program in the following directions:
-improve understanding of susceptible populations by examining gene-environment interactions.
-test the transferability of a land use regression model (LUR), a method used for assigning air pollution exposures in epidemiological studies, to different geographic areas.
-improve the understanding of factors influencing personal exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2).
-characterise air pollutant exposures in urban settings and their impact on respiratory health.
My vision is to conduct research that impacts on urban transport and planning policy to help reduce the burden of TRAP exposures on health.

Mr Sam Clifford

Mr Sam Clifford

I am completing my PhD in statistical modelling of air quality at Queensland University of Technology. My work on spatio-temporal modelling of ultrafine particles is part of the International Laboratory for Air Quality and Health's project, Ultrafine Particles from Traffic Emissions and Child Health, and aims to quantify the spatial and temporal variation in air quality in the Brisbane Metropolitan Area. As a CAR postdoctoral fellow, I will develop and apply models for analysis as diverse as personal sampling exposure data, clustering health and demographics survey data and meta-analysis of fungus and aerosol concentration.